Photo 18 Mar 1,542 notes disneysfrozenguy:

kioewen:

Elsa - “Protector of This Dominion”
One of the things that some readers fail to realize about Elsa – but this is a vitally important point – is that in her flight from Arendelle, she is, in fact, fullfiling the primary oath that she took when she was crowned monarch: and that is, to be the “protector of her dominion.”
According to the novelization – in the film, this speech is uttered in Old Norse, so for this we need to refer to the novelization – the bishop proclaims Elsa to be "The undoubted queen, protector of this dominion," as he bestows upon Elsa the crown jewels. And Elsa – whose sense of responsibility and self-sacrifice always supplants any concerns for her own well-being or happiness – takes these worlds very seriously and, by her actions, fulfills them.
Why does Elsa leave the kingdom?
Because she becomes a danger to it.
It is precisely because of the oath that she took – the oath to be the “protector of this dominion” – that she exiles herself.
She is literally defending the realm by removing herself from Arendelle, because she herself has become the biggest threat to Arendelle.
As a little girl, when her powers were minor, she nearly fatally injured her sister – and that happened at a time when she was only slightly disconcerted.
Ever since then, as the film clearly establishes, her powers have been growing. And she cannot control those powers even under the best of circumstances.
But now – suddenly – when she is exposed, she stands before her entire kingdom and presents a threat to every man, woman, and child in Arendelle.
In the glove scene, she witnesses her powers erupt as threatening spikes pointed towards everyone. If they had been just a little bigger, people could have been impaled.
Again, remember: she nearly killed her sister once already, and since then, her powers have only gotten worse. Now, suddenly, all of her subjects stand right before her; now no longer is it just her sister in danger, but everyone in Arendelle.
When she asks the Duke to stay away (for his own safety), ice shoots uncontrollably out of her hand, causing him to fall. The Duke and his men could have been injured right there. (It happened to her sister, after all.) The Duke is a panicky sort, but he is right is his assessment of the danger that Elsa poses.
Elsa, therefore, recognizes herself as a walking weapon of mass destruction and a threat to any geographical spot that she inhabits. (She obviously has no way of knowing or even guessing that her power extends far past where she is, to even to where she is not.)
For the good of her people, for their safety, then, Elsa removes herself from the kingdom.
In performing this self-sacrificial act, she is not abandoning her royal oath. Rather, she is fulfilling her oath – her oath to be the “protector of the dominion.”
She is protecting her dominion from its greatest, most immediate threat.
She is protecting it from herself.
She clearly has no other options. What could she do – stand around, attempting to get herself under control, and possibly blast people in the meantime, as she once blasted her sister?
The only fault that anyone could possibly lay at Elsa’s feet is that perhaps she should have exiled herself from Arendelle even sooner.
But that is an unreasonable expectation to have of a teen girl whose parents have just died. And besides, she clearly felt the responsibility of at least trying to fulfill her duty as queen without endangering anyone.
It was a reasonable attempt. It failed. Leaving her with no other option but exile.
The only other solution available to her apart from exile is suicide. But if Arendelle is a Christian land (as the religious trappings of the coronation ceremony indicate that it is), then suicide is a damnable offense and absolutely forbidden under any circumstances.
Therefore, exile is the only option left to Elsa, to keep her people safe, no matter that this presents her with the prospect of a lifetime of isolation and banishment. But because of her noble nature, because of her impulse always to put the safety of others above her own wants, she makes this terrible sacrifice and removes herself from Arendelle.
[More below the cut — warning: minor spoilers.]
Read More

All of this magnificent essay is one huge reason why I love Elsa so much. Her devotion to her people and her family is beyond admirable. She is without a doubt the most noble character I have ever seen in my entire life.
Absolutely caring, benevolent amd , selfless as she is I love her with all my little heart. Since the first time I got to watch Frozen I’ve watched Elsa at every moment, intensely, deeply. Thinking, analyzing, understanding her character. And she never failes to amaze me. To completely mesmerize me everytime I watch the movie. She is really one of a kind. She is already one immensely extraordinary ruler. And she’ll be the best there ever is and was.
Her personality, her priorities, her sacrifice, all of her moves me in a level none other character has. I love her forever and always.

disneysfrozenguy:

kioewen:

Elsa - “Protector of This Dominion”

One of the things that some readers fail to realize about Elsa – but this is a vitally important point – is that in her flight from Arendelle, she is, in fact, fullfiling the primary oath that she took when she was crowned monarch: and that is, to be the “protector of her dominion.”

According to the novelization  in the film, this speech is uttered in Old Norse, so for this we need to refer to the novelization – the bishop proclaims Elsa to be "The undoubted queen, protector of this dominion," as he bestows upon Elsa the crown jewels. And Elsa  whose sense of responsibility and self-sacrifice always supplants any concerns for her own well-being or happiness  takes these worlds very seriously and, by her actions, fulfills them.

Why does Elsa leave the kingdom?

Because she becomes a danger to it.

It is precisely because of the oath that she took  the oath to be the “protector of this dominion”  that she exiles herself.

She is literally defending the realm by removing herself from Arendelle, because she herself has become the biggest threat to Arendelle.

As a little girl, when her powers were minor, she nearly fatally injured her sister – and that happened at a time when she was only slightly disconcerted.

Ever since then, as the film clearly establishes, her powers have been growing. And she cannot control those powers even under the best of circumstances.

But now  suddenly  when she is exposed, she stands before her entire kingdom and presents a threat to every man, woman, and child in Arendelle.

In the glove scene, she witnesses her powers erupt as threatening spikes pointed towards everyone. If they had been just a little bigger, people could have been impaled.

Again, remember: she nearly killed her sister once already, and since then, her powers have only gotten worse. Now, suddenly, all of her subjects stand right before her; now no longer is it just her sister in danger, but everyone in Arendelle.

When she asks the Duke to stay away (for his own safety), ice shoots uncontrollably out of her hand, causing him to fall. The Duke and his men could have been injured right there. (It happened to her sister, after all.) The Duke is a panicky sort, but he is right is his assessment of the danger that Elsa poses.

Elsa, therefore, recognizes herself as a walking weapon of mass destruction and a threat to any geographical spot that she inhabits. (She obviously has no way of knowing or even guessing that her power extends far past where she is, to even to where she is not.)

For the good of her people, for their safety, then, Elsa removes herself from the kingdom.

In performing this self-sacrificial act, she is not abandoning her royal oath. Rather, she is fulfilling her oath  her oath to be the “protector of the dominion.”

She is protecting her dominion from its greatest, most immediate threat.

She is protecting it from herself.

She clearly has no other options. What could she do  stand around, attempting to get herself under control, and possibly blast people in the meantime, as she once blasted her sister?

The only fault that anyone could possibly lay at Elsa’s feet is that perhaps she should have exiled herself from Arendelle even sooner.

But that is an unreasonable expectation to have of a teen girl whose parents have just died. And besides, she clearly felt the responsibility of at least trying to fulfill her duty as queen without endangering anyone.

It was a reasonable attempt. It failed. Leaving her with no other option but exile.

The only other solution available to her apart from exile is suicide. But if Arendelle is a Christian land (as the religious trappings of the coronation ceremony indicate that it is), then suicide is a damnable offense and absolutely forbidden under any circumstances.

Therefore, exile is the only option left to Elsa, to keep her people safe, no matter that this presents her with the prospect of a lifetime of isolation and banishment. But because of her noble nature, because of her impulse always to put the safety of others above her own wants, she makes this terrible sacrifice and removes herself from Arendelle.

[More below the cut — warning: minor spoilers.]

Read More

All of this magnificent essay is one huge reason why I love Elsa so much. Her devotion to her people and her family is beyond admirable. She is without a doubt the most noble character I have ever seen in my entire life.

Absolutely caring, benevolent amd , selfless as she is I love her with all my little heart. Since the first time I got to watch Frozen I’ve watched Elsa at every moment, intensely, deeply. Thinking, analyzing, understanding her character. And she never failes to amaze me. To completely mesmerize me everytime I watch the movie. She is really one of a kind. She is already one immensely extraordinary ruler. And she’ll be the best there ever is and was.

Her personality, her priorities, her sacrifice, all of her moves me in a level none other character has. I love her forever and always.

Photo 16 Mar 2,082 notes disneysfrozenguy:


Hans Elsa by nimby0o0

XD <3

Elsa blowing Hans an especially frosty kiss; an adorably playful moment of Helsa (Hans x Elsa) — the love story that Frozen could have told and should have told.
(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)
(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

disneysfrozenguy:

Hans Elsa by nimby0o0

XD <3

Elsa blowing Hans an especially frosty kiss; an adorably playful moment of Helsa (Hans x Elsa) — the love story that Frozen could have told and should have told.

(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)

(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

Photo 16 Mar 260 notes Jelsa (Jack Frost x Elsa) &#8212; gazing at the Aurora Borealis (the Northern Lights).
(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)
(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

Jelsa (Jack Frost x Elsa) — gazing at the Aurora Borealis (the Northern Lights).

(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)

(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

via hey you.
Video 16 Mar 427 notes

I love you
I hate you
So screw you
You’re making me crazy

Helsa (Hans x Elsa) in a scene that is a popular motif for this ship — their roles reversed, with Hans now a prisoner in the dungeon. Elsa is initially satisfied at his chained state, but then, her love for the prince overcomes her.

(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)

(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

Video 16 Mar 2,687 notes

jipzuru:

Hey… Jack wake up.

Yeah! human Jackson and beautiful Elsa again!

Jelsa (Jack Frost x Elsa) with Elsa about to awaken with a kiss a sleeping Jack in his original, human form, Jackson Overland (an interesting inversion of a sleeping beauty motif).

(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)

(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

Photo 16 Mar 712 notes disneysnowprincess:

I need this to be canon more than I need air.

Helsa (Hans x Elsa ) - the love story that Frozen could have told, and should have told.
(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)
(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

disneysnowprincess:

I need this to be canon more than I need air.

Helsa (Hans x Elsa ) - the love story that Frozen could have told, and should have told.

(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)

(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

Photo 16 Mar 124 notes legendary-fangirl:


White DayArtist:MageK [pixiv ID: 551945] | photo


Jelsa (Jack Frost x Elsa) &#8212; a sweet moment.
(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)
(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

legendary-fangirl:

White Day
Artist:
MageK [pixiv ID: 551945] | photo

Jelsa (Jack Frost x Elsa) — a sweet moment.

(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)

(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

Photo 11 Mar 404 notes kioewen:

Elsa Inspired Q Speedpaint by Toodles
How Would Elsa Survive in Her Ice Palace?
Although the film Frozen suffers from numerous shortcomings and deficiencies in logic, one question that comes up with surprising frequency among viewers has a fairly straightforward answer.
How would Elsa survive in her ice palace?
 What would she eat?
First of all, it is worth pointing out that Elsa likely doesn’t consider this question when she exiles herself from Arendelle. She is, as far as she knows, sacrificing her life to keep the people of Arendelle safe from her life-threatening magic.
However, after a few hours’ reflection, it would become obvious to Elsa (who is consistently intelligent and rational throughout the film, despite her brief moments of emotional stress) how she could, in fact, sustain herself indefinitely on the North Mountain.
For the solution to the supposed dilemma of Elsa’s sustenance, we hardly even need to make up overly elaborate headcanons. The answer is readily available within the content of the film, just as we have it.
Drinking-water is obviously not a problem, as it is in plentiful supply everywhere around Elsa. If you have snow, you have water. She could easily fashion a large ice lens to melt snow in large quantities, via sunlight, as well as to light a fire.
And yes, Elsa could easily have a fire going in her ice palace. Not for her own warmth – as the cold does not bother her – but to melt water and to cook. The Inuit keep fires blazing in their igloos, and the igloos are surprisingly resistant to these heat sources. And of course, with her magic, Elsa could perpetually refashion any segment of the ice palace as it begins to soften in the fire’s heat.
Yes, she could easily fashion an ice hearth for melting water and for cooking.
But cooking what, you ask?
Whatever wild game exists in the woods around her mountain, along with fowl and fish.
How would she obtain this game?
As soon as Elsa discovers that she can create sentient life, she can give birth to any manner of sentient snow creatures — in the manner of Marshmallow — that can execute her will; creatures all tailor made for whatever task they would be required to perform.
 Smaller creatures could easily gather nuts and berries, while snow predators with Marshmallow’s ferocity would have no trouble hunting down larger prey and bringing such provender back to the ice palace.
Likewise, ice-fashioned birds of prey would be effective fishers in the fjord, or in other bodies of water.
But how long would it take Elsa to discover that she does possess this power of life-creation?
Likely not very long at all. Anna finds Elsa after only a day and a half, whereupon Elsa is introduced to Olaf. But factoring out that event, Elsa’s express purpose in exile — after fleeing from Arendelle to protect the citizens from her magic — is, as she states, to “test the limits” of her power. She would discover that she can create sentient creatures soon enough.
This means that, when it comes accounting for Elsa’s food sources, we only need to consider the time period between Elsa’s exile and the moment when she discovers that she can create sentient life forms. Once she discovers that she has this ability, then those snow creatures can track down whatever she needs.
So how would Elsa obtain sustenance during this intermediary period?
By using her magic to hunt.
This would be remarkably easy for her to do. All that it would require of her is that she occasionally leave her ice palace to make forays into the woods around her mountain.
In the film, it takes Elsa just a few moments to learn how to use her magic to fend off assassins via the creation of ice walls, and to discover just how lethal she can be via ice spikes.
With these skills alone, ice walls and ice spikes, and just a few hours’ practice, she could easily take down any wild game.
The moment that she would spot any prey – from wild deer, to hares, to boars, to wolves, to bears, to any other animals of the forest – these creatures would be hers for the taking, in a simple, two-step process:
1. Cast ice walls to corral them.2. Use ice spikes, like spears, to take them down.
Remember: with her magic, Elsa possesses the finest tools that any hunter could ever ask for: built-in projectile weaponry that can be as lethal as she needs it to be, plus the ability to corral animals with ice barriers.
 She is thus fully equipped to easily herd and put down any animals that she sights, even from a great distance.
And having brought down whatever game she wishes, how would she transport it back to the ice palace?
 Simple: slides of ice would make any route frictionless, while her own power of propulsion (seen even as a child, as she propelled herself and her sister across the ice floor) would whisk her, and any hoard of game that she might pile up, back to the ice palace with little effort.
Would Elsa be squeamish about hunting?
 Not likely — especially not for survival needs. In the 19th century, the European aristocracy, even monarchs, were still inclined to hunt for sport. The men would engage in this practice more than the women would, of course, but it is not impossible that Elsa would have been taken along on hunting journeys as a child. At the very least, she would have been brought up with a favorable view of hunting, and without our 21st-century stigma against it.
Again, once Elsa discovers that she can create sentient life forms such as Marshmallow to do her bidding, she can create however many, and in whatever form, she requires to provide her with sustenance, via both hunting and gathering. Until that time, she would merely need to occasionally venture into the woods to hunt, and with her magic, doing so would be quite elementary.
Problem solved.
(Adapted and expanded, with permission, from a forum post.)
(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)
(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

kioewen:

Elsa Inspired Q Speedpaint by Toodles

How Would Elsa Survive in Her Ice Palace?

Although the film Frozen suffers from numerous shortcomings and deficiencies in logic, one question that comes up with surprising frequency among viewers has a fairly straightforward answer.

How would Elsa survive in her ice palace?

What would she eat?

First of all, it is worth pointing out that Elsa likely doesn’t consider this question when she exiles herself from Arendelle. She is, as far as she knows, sacrificing her life to keep the people of Arendelle safe from her life-threatening magic.

However, after a few hours’ reflection, it would become obvious to Elsa (who is consistently intelligent and rational throughout the film, despite her brief moments of emotional stress) how she could, in fact, sustain herself indefinitely on the North Mountain.

For the solution to the supposed dilemma of Elsa’s sustenance, we hardly even need to make up overly elaborate headcanons. The answer is readily available within the content of the film, just as we have it.

Drinking-water is obviously not a problem, as it is in plentiful supply everywhere around Elsa. If you have snow, you have water. She could easily fashion a large ice lens to melt snow in large quantities, via sunlight, as well as to light a fire.

And yes, Elsa could easily have a fire going in her ice palace. Not for her own warmth – as the cold does not bother her – but to melt water and to cook. The Inuit keep fires blazing in their igloos, and the igloos are surprisingly resistant to these heat sources. And of course, with her magic, Elsa could perpetually refashion any segment of the ice palace as it begins to soften in the fire’s heat.

Yes, she could easily fashion an ice hearth for melting water and for cooking.

But cooking what, you ask?

Whatever wild game exists in the woods around her mountain, along with fowl and fish.

How would she obtain this game?

As soon as Elsa discovers that she can create sentient life, she can give birth to any manner of sentient snow creatures — in the manner of Marshmallow — that can execute her will; creatures all tailor made for whatever task they would be required to perform.

Smaller creatures could easily gather nuts and berries, while snow predators with Marshmallow’s ferocity would have no trouble hunting down larger prey and bringing such provender back to the ice palace.

Likewise, ice-fashioned birds of prey would be effective fishers in the fjord, or in other bodies of water.

But how long would it take Elsa to discover that she does possess this power of life-creation?

Likely not very long at all. Anna finds Elsa after only a day and a half, whereupon Elsa is introduced to Olaf. But factoring out that event, Elsa’s express purpose in exile — after fleeing from Arendelle to protect the citizens from her magic — is, as she states, to “test the limits” of her power. She would discover that she can create sentient creatures soon enough.

This means that, when it comes accounting for Elsa’s food sources, we only need to consider the time period between Elsa’s exile and the moment when she discovers that she can create sentient life forms. Once she discovers that she has this ability, then those snow creatures can track down whatever she needs.

So how would Elsa obtain sustenance during this intermediary period?

By using her magic to hunt.

This would be remarkably easy for her to do. All that it would require of her is that she occasionally leave her ice palace to make forays into the woods around her mountain.

In the film, it takes Elsa just a few moments to learn how to use her magic to fend off assassins via the creation of ice walls, and to discover just how lethal she can be via ice spikes.

With these skills alone, ice walls and ice spikes, and just a few hours’ practice, she could easily take down any wild game.

The moment that she would spot any prey – from wild deer, to hares, to boars, to wolves, to bears, to any other animals of the forest – these creatures would be hers for the taking, in a simple, two-step process:

1. Cast ice walls to corral them.
2. Use ice spikes, like spears, to take them down.

Remember: with her magic, Elsa possesses the finest tools that any hunter could ever ask for: built-in projectile weaponry that can be as lethal as she needs it to be, plus the ability to corral animals with ice barriers.

She is thus fully equipped to easily herd and put down any animals that she sights, even from a great distance.

And having brought down whatever game she wishes, how would she transport it back to the ice palace?

Simple: slides of ice would make any route frictionless, while her own power of propulsion (seen even as a child, as she propelled herself and her sister across the ice floor) would whisk her, and any hoard of game that she might pile up, back to the ice palace with little effort.

Would Elsa be squeamish about hunting?

Not likely — especially not for survival needs. In the 19th century, the European aristocracy, even monarchs, were still inclined to hunt for sport. The men would engage in this practice more than the women would, of course, but it is not impossible that Elsa would have been taken along on hunting journeys as a child. At the very least, she would have been brought up with a favorable view of hunting, and without our 21st-century stigma against it.

Again, once Elsa discovers that she can create sentient life forms such as Marshmallow to do her bidding, she can create however many, and in whatever form, she requires to provide her with sustenance, via both hunting and gathering. Until that time, she would merely need to occasionally venture into the woods to hunt, and with her magic, doing so would be quite elementary.

Problem solved.

(Adapted and expanded, with permission, from a forum post.)

(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)

(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

Photo 11 Mar 48 notes marcibeautyqueen:

…And I’ll love you for a thousand more…

Jack Frost x Elsa &#8212; a stylish and cinematic Jelsa kiss worth of classic Hollywood (for Elsa has an undeniable silver-screen glamour about her).
Whatever man wins her heart in the Frozen sequel, the moment that Elsa experiences her first romantic kiss will be one of the most memorable ever seen on film.
(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)
(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

marcibeautyqueen:

…And I’ll love you for a thousand more…

Jack Frost x Elsa — a stylish and cinematic Jelsa kiss worth of classic Hollywood (for Elsa has an undeniable silver-screen glamour about her).

Whatever man wins her heart in the Frozen sequel, the moment that Elsa experiences her first romantic kiss will be one of the most memorable ever seen on film.

(An accurate account of Elsa’s motivation in the film appears [here].)

(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

Photo 11 Mar 347 notes just-a-weirdo-named-amy:

kioewen:

The Top Fifteen Mistakes That Frozen DIDN’T Make
As I noted in my previous review, I consider Frozen to be an exceptionally good film, with a few notable missed opportunities, but overall a stirring cinematic experience, and easily Disney’s finest movie since The Lion King.
But although one might wish that Frozen had done a few things differently, it’s vital to realize that a key reason for the film’s success is the fact that it avoided a host of errors that it could easily have committed.
In short, Frozen is great not only because of what’s in it, but also because of what’s not.
The following is a list of some of the most egregious mistakes that Frozen could have made, but didn’t. The list includes a number of spoilers, so it appears below the cut:
Read More

very yes

just-a-weirdo-named-amy:

kioewen:

The Top Fifteen Mistakes That Frozen DIDN’T Make

As I noted in my previous review, I consider Frozen to be an exceptionally good film, with a few notable missed opportunities, but overall a stirring cinematic experience, and easily Disney’s finest movie since The Lion King.

But although one might wish that Frozen had done a few things differently, it’s vital to realize that a key reason for the film’s success is the fact that it avoided a host of errors that it could easily have committed.

In short, Frozen is great not only because of what’s in it, but also because of what’s not.

The following is a list of some of the most egregious mistakes that Frozen could have made, but didn’t. The list includes a number of spoilers, so it appears below the cut:

Read More

very yes


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